DailyHalacha.com for Mobile Devices Now Available

Select Halacha by date:

Or by subject:

Or by keyword:
Search titles and keywords only
Search All    

Weekly Perasha Insights
Shabbat Morning Derasha on the Parasha
Register To Receive The Daily Halacha By Email / Unsubscribe
Daily Parasha Insights via Live Teleconference
Syrian Sephardic Wedding Guide
Download Special Tefilot
A Glossary Of Terms Frequently Referred To In The Daily Halachot
About The Sources Frequently Quoted In The Halachot
About Rabbi Eli Mansour
Purchase Passover Haggadah with In Depth Insights by Rabbi Eli Mansour and Rabbi David Sutton
About DailyHalacha.Com
Contact us
Useful Links
Refund/Privacy Policy
Back to Home Page

Halacha is In Memory Of
 Dovid Chaim ben Tzvi Akiva Rottenstreich A"H

Dedicated By
anonymous

Click Here to Sponsor Daily Halacha
  Clip Length: 3:04 (mm:ss)
      
(File size: 718 KB)
(File size:736 KB)
Asking One’s Fellow for Forgiveness Before Yom Kippur

The Shulhan Aruch (Orah Haim 606:1) writes that one does not earn atonement on Yom Kippur for offenses committed against other people unless he receives their forgiveness. Therefore, it is imperative for a person to approach those people whom he has wronged during the year to ask them forgiveness before Yom Kippur. This applies to both financial and verbal offenses. In the case of a financial offense, of course, one must also return the funds in question.

The Shulhan Aruch writes that if the victim does not grant forgiveness when the offender first approaches him, the offender should return to him, as many as three times. He then earns atonement even if the victim still refuses to forgive. As the Be’ur Halacha (commentary by Rabbi Yisrael Meir Kagan, 1839-1933) notes, it appears from the Shulhan Aruch’s presentation of this Halacha that a person should approach the victim accompanied by three people. Even when he approaches the victim for the first time, according to the Shulhan Aruch, he should bring three people along with him. The Rambam (Rabbi Moshe Maimonides, 1135-1204), however, on the basis of the Talmud Yerushalmi, maintains that when the offender approaches the victim for the first time he does not have to bring three people with him. If the victim refuses to forgive, then he should return as many as three times together with three other people. The Kaf Ha’haim (Rabbi Yaakov Haim Sofer, 1870-1939) writes that the accepted practice follows the Rambam’s view, and thus one is not required to bring three people the first time he approaches his fellow to request forgiveness.

The importance of requesting forgiveness from one’s fellow before Yom Kippur cannot be overstated. According to some opinions, one cannot even earn atonement for sins committed against God if he does not receive forgiveness from the people whom he had wronged. Furthermore, the Kaf Ha’haim writes that if a person does not seek his friend’s forgiveness before Yom Kippur, then the prosecuting angel comes before God and argues against this person. The angel contends that the person is not concerned about his sins, as evidenced by his unwillingness to ask for his fellow’s forgiveness, and therefore should not be granted atonement on Yom Kippur. One must therefore make every effort before Yom Kippur to make amends with all those whom he had wronged over the course of the year.

Finally, the Sages also emphasize the importance of granting forgiveness to others. The Rabbis teach that one should not be “cruel” by refusing to grant forgiveness to somebody who offended him. A person who willingly grants forgiveness to others will earn God’s forgiveness for whatever sins he may have committed.

Summary: It is imperative to ask forgiveness before Yom Kippur from all those whom one had wronged during the year. If the individual refuses to forgive, then one should return to him with three people, as many as three more times, to request forgiveness. At that point, he need not ask forgiveness any further. It is proper for the victim to grant the offender forgiveness.

 


Recent Daily Halachot...
Yom Kippur – Wearing Gold Jewelry
Yom Kippur – Arbit on Mosa’eh Yom Kippur
Halachot of Habdala When Yom Kippur Falls on Shabbat
Kapparot For a Pregnant Woman
Is “Va’ani Tefilati” Recited at Minha When Yom Kippur Falls on Shabbat?
Must Pregnant Women Fast on Yom Kippur?
Learning Torah on Yom Kippur Night
The Unique Opportunity of the Ten Days of Repentance, and the Special Obligation of Repentance on Yom Kippur
Should Children Fast on Yom Kippur?
The Misva to Eat on Ereb Yom Kippur
Ereb Yom Kippur – Immersing in a Mikveh; Wearing Gold Jewelry; Preparing the Home
Laws and Customs of Kapparot
Halachot for One Who Needs to Eat on Yom Kippur
The Yom Kippur Eve Prayer Service When it Falls on Friday Night
Asking One’s Parents for Forgiveness Before Yom Kippur
Page of 164
2448 Halachot found